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Original Issue

SUGAR BOWL

TENNESSEE

Coach Bowden Wyatt finished his rebuilding job at Tennessee by the start of his second year, and now his unbeaten Volunteers are off to the Sugar Bowl. This team, which seldom makes a mistake, emphasizes the kicking game as a prime offensive weapon and can bottle up an opponent with a punt better than any squad in the country. A mistake against Tennessee's ball-hawking defenders is suicide. The Vols have recovered 21 enemy fumbles this year, turned 12 of them into touchdowns. They have picked off 16 enemy passes, run three back for scores and used seven others to set up scoring drives. In virtually every game Tennessee has been held even or out-gained by the enemy, yet they still win. Offensively Tennessee operates from the single wing and uses a balanced line. It is a team with a great long-gaining potential.

20 STOCKTON ADKINS, QB—Great blocking back, carries only on rare buck-lateral.

31 TOMMY BRONSON, FB—Excellent sweep blocker, tremendous power through middle.

45 JOHN MAJORS, LH—Good at everything, no apparent weaknesses. Runs, passes, kicks—real triple threat All-America.

15 BILL ANDERSON, RH—Seldom carries except on wingback reverses, has averaged 11 yards a carry. Excellent receiver.

50 BUBBA HOWE, C—Excellent linebacker, often jars ball loose and recovers. A good blocker, best when chips down.

40 AL CARTER, LH—-Powerful runner, has speed and deception. Very weak defensively, is often caught out of position.

63 BRUCE BURNHAM, LG—Curiously underrated all season, he blocks hard, leads weak side off-tackle plays.

66 BILL JOHNSON, RG—Very fast, trails plays well, often dumps runner from behind on sweeps. Yields on straight power play.

73 CHARLIE RADER, LT—Steady, unspectacular, fair speed, charges hard, can be moved and trapped. Has good initial contact.

76 JOHN GORDY, RT—Tremendous strength, difficult to move, leads team in tackles.

86 BUDDY CRUZE, LE-Best end in the South, tremendous receiver even with three men on him, fakes beautifully, good speed.

84 ROGER URBANO, RE—Strong on defense, good at dropping off on pass plays.

BAYLOR

Coach Sam Boyd's Bears wound up third (3-2-0) in the Southwest Conference behind Texas A&M and TCU, but many feel they had more manpower than any other team in the Conference. At many positions the second unit is the equal of the first, but defensively—and the Baylor defense is outstanding—the varsity has an advantage. Baylor used a 5-4 all the way and, despite the size of its line, had good speed and fine reactions. When Quarterback Doyle Traylor broke an anklebone in October and missed the last half of the season, hard times hit the Bears. The absence of his strong arm and leadership accounted in large part for the subsequent sluggishness of the Bear attack. But Traylor has mended rapidly and is expected to play against Tennessee. His imagination, ability as a passer and daring add dash to the offense.

12 BOBBY JONES, QB—Weakest position on team offensively and defensively.

37 REUBEN SAAGE, FB—Not an all-the-way threat, but has good drive. Can be faked on defense and moves up too fast on a pass. Blocks well.

27 DEL SHOFNER, LH-Elusive runner, receiver with big hands, tremendous speed and agility. Defends better on passes.

44 BOBBY PETERS, RH—Slashing-type runner with tendency to fumble. Fair speed, good blocker, average defensively.

56 LEE HARRINGTON, C—Good, steady center but not outstanding in any department.

11 DOYLE TRAYLOR, QB—Great passer and even greater inspirational force as a leader. His return could furnish big lift.

55 BILL GLASS, LG—Smart, speedy line backer, dogged pursuer, tackles all over field.

62 CHARLES HORTON, RG—Outstanding sophomore, plays middle guard, brutal on blind side blocks on punt returns, aggressive.

76 BOBBY OLIVER, LT—Fast and quick for a big man. Very good at rushing passer and containing him. Not a good blocker.

78 DAVE LUNCEFORD, RT—Tough but slow, poor pursuit, good blocker, hard to trap because he does not penetrate deeply.

89 EARL MILLER, LE—Has trouble against running plays to outside but recovers nicely. Good blocker, adequate receiver.

86 JERRY MARCONTELL, RE—Biggest asset is defense, turning in wide stuff. Very good receiver, good blocker.

TWO PHOTOS

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20

ADKINS

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45

MAJORS

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50

HOWE

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63

BURNHAM

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73

RADER

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86

CRUZE

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31

BRONSON

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15

ANDERSON

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40

CARTER

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86

JOHNSON

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76

GORDY

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84

URBANO

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12

JONES

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27

SHOFNER

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56

HARRINGTON

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55

GLASS

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76

OLIVER

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89

MILLER

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37

SAAGE

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44

PETERS

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11

TRAYLOR

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62

HORTON

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78

LUNCEFORD

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86

MARCONTELL

ILLUSTRATION

27

37

12

44

86

ILLUSTRATION

ILLUSTRATION

89

76

55

56

62

78

86

12

27

37

44

BAYLOR THREE-WAY PASS

THREE RECEIVERS ARE PLANNED for this pass, coming after a fake to Fullback Saage (37), designed to pull defense in. The Baylor quarterback, Jones (12), slides down the line to his right, faking to the fullback, Saage, who drives toward the tackle hole. Then Saage slants wide to his right after the fake, in position to take a pass. Marcontell (86), the right end, goes down and sharply to his right in front of the left safety. The right half, Peters (44), runs the same route, but shallower, pulling the linebacker with him. Jones drops back behind the blocking of the left half, Shofner (27), and the center, Harrington (56), and throws to whichever receiver has worked free. Normally, this will be the fullback.