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LOS ANGELES DODGERS

Here are your Dodgers, Los Angeles. Once they were magnificent, but now they are playing on a memory. They have lost the flash of Robinson on the base paths, the boom of Campanella's bat. Applaud them anyway and perhaps in time they will reward you with a pennant. But not for a while
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THE MANAGER

Walter Alston (24), player, struggled in the minor leagues for 12 years. He appeared in just one major league game, that with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. In his only time at bat, he struck out. However, Walter Alston, manager, has hit a couple of home runs. He began with Portsmouth in the Middle Atlantic League in 1940 and worked his way up slowly through the Dodger chain. After four years with Montreal in the International League, he reached the majors. That was in 1954. He won pennants in 1955-56 and the Series in 1955. His coaches are former Dodger Manager Charley Dressen (7) at third base, Greg Mulleavy (31) at first base and Pitching Coach Joe Becker (33).

ANALYSIS OF THIS YEAR'S DODGERS

STRONG POINTS: In a word, pitching. The Dodgers have all kinds: big ones, little ones, right-handers, lefthanders, starters and relievers. And they're all good. Don Drysdale, for instance, is fast developing into the game's best right-hander. He is tall (6 feet 6) and young (21) and hitters say he brings back ugly memories of Ewell Blackwell. His sweeping sidearm motion and that little flick he gives his gloved hand at the last moment make his pitches tough to see. Seventeen wins and a 2.69 ERA last year are proof. When Johnny Podres is just right, there's nobody just righter. Half of the 12 games he won last year were shutouts. When Podres is wrong, well, there's always Clem Labine, Ed Roebuck, Don Bessent or Jackie Collum. Labine had the miseries last summer, but be is well again. Those four give the Dodgers if not the best certainly the deepest relief staff in baseball. Don Newcombe pitches as well as ever until someone hits one. Then everyone hits one. Still, he is a potential winner. So is Carl Erskine. Danny McDevitt and Sandy Koufax are two young lefties with wicked fast balls and a minimum of control. Either or both could ripen in the California sun. Some of the good Dodger hitters linger on. Gil Hodges is magic around first base and may hit 90 home runs over that friendly left-field wall. Carl Furillo, who has hit .300 for more years than he cares to remember, will play right field. Duke Snider can still hit if he can stand. But can he stand? Junior Gilliam and Charlie Neal hit a lot of singles and run the bases like a pair of whippets. Gino Cimoli could always field. Last year he learned to hit and he will play left field, or possibly center field, depending on the condition of Snider's knee.

WEAK SPOTS: Roy Campanella was old and his batting average had disappeared below the horizon, but he was the Dodger catcher and now he is not. Rube Walker can catch, but can't run. Joe Pignatano has yet to prove he can hit. John Roseboro shows promise, but he needs experience and the major leagues is a costly place to gather it. The Dodgers may trade for a catcher, perhaps one from the American League, but until they find someone this position is a major source of concern. The infield is unsettled. Neal played well at shortstop last year, but he will probably be used at second base because of his skill at making the double play. Fiery Don Zimmer can play shortstop, but must hit better than .219. Randy Jackson has never played third base for the Dodgers as he once did for the Cubs. Dick Gray, up from St. Paul, may take the position away from him. By right of ancient treaty, Pee Wee Reese is entitled to shortstop, and he can still play it—for a while. Gilliam is available for second, third or outfield, but some think he may be a part of a trade for that catcher. For first-base insurance, in the event that Hodges is called to duty at third or in the outfield, the Dodgers may also keep hard-hitting Norm Larker, a left-handed first baseman.

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES: Gray is no Billy Cox around third base, but he is dependable and hits with fair power. Last year with St. Paul he had 16 home runs and batted .297. Larker and Don Demeter were also with St. Paul and both did well. Larker hit .323 and Demeter .309. If Snider's knee fails, Demeter will see plenty of action. He is a fine fielder with good range and a strong arm.

THE BIG IFS: Somewhere there must be a catcher and if he" can be found, either on another team or right under their own noses, the Dodgers will have solved a major problem. But more important is shortstop. At 39, Reese cannot be counted on for more than 100 games. But even 100 games of the old-style Reese shortstop would help, for he is still the heart of the ball club. If it should develop that Snider cannot play, if his knee should collapse, then so might the Dodgers.

THE VOICES

Vince Scully (29, engaging) did his first broadcasting while playing outfield for Fordham University. After graduating he gained an interview with Red Barber who was instrumental in getting Scully a job with CBS football roundup. Soon after he joined Barber and Connie Desmond as the third man on the Brooklyn Dodger announcing team. Now senior man, Scully will do only radio in Los Angeles. Californians will find his delivery crisp and knowing. Says Scully: "I have one advantage over older announcers. My generation grew up with listening experience. I know what I like to hear and try to remember that when I'm on the air." JERRY DOGGETT, (42, cheerful) was reared in the Midwest, but he was announcing baseball deep in the heart of the Texas League when the Dodgers signed him on in 1956. Like Scully, his voice is crisp and enthusiastic, his knowledge of the game sound, but there are times during exciting moments of games when, alas, he seems to lose partial control of the situation.

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DUKE SNIDER

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GIL HODGES

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CARL FURILLO

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PEE WEE REESE

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GINO CIMOLI

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CHARLIE NEAL

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JIM GILLIAM

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RUBE WALKER

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VINCE SCULLY

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JOHNNY PODRES

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DON DRYSDALE

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DON NEWCOMBE

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CLEM LABINE

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ILLUSTRATION

THE OUTLOOK: Because they have a lot of good, young pitchers, a few good, young pitchers, a few good, old hitters and because they are playing in a new environment, the Dodgers should win more games than they lose. But there are so many weaknesses...the catching problem, the lack of depth and the doubtful status of some of the older players...that it is difficult to imagine this team winning a. pennant. One key injury and the Dodgers might be through. But they can hope for better—after all. they are playing close to Hollywood this year, and thereabouts a happy ending is de rigueur.