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SCOREBOARD

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TENNIS—Barry MacKay beat Dick Savitt for U.S. Indoor Championship in best-rounded, most representative field indoor tennis has drawn in years. Young Earl Buchholz of St. Louis defeated world's ranking amateur Neale Fraser in third round, only to be edged out by MacKay in semifinals. Though a strong international field took part in the championships, only four aggressive Americans were left by the semifinal round: MacKay, Savitt, Buchholz, Charles McKinley. Economics of indoor tennis has been an increasing problem in recent years. This year's sponsors successfully shared with other winter circuit tournaments the travel costs of such foreign stars as Australia's Fraser and Roy Emerson, Spain's Andres Gimeno, grossed $20,000 for what looked like a finish in the black.

In the Women's National Indoor Championships at Brookline, Mass., Carole Wright of Brooklyn, N.Y., needed only 40 minutes to turn the tables on defending champion Lois Felix, who defeated her in last year's finals. The 21-year-old southpaw displayed a stinging service—both flat and sliced—and rushing game for a 6-1, 6-2 victory and Indoor title.

BASEBALL—A one-ton wrecking ball, painted to resemble a baseball, was swung against the visitors' dugout at Ebbets Field as razing of the pre-Los Angeles home of the Brooklyn Dodgers began to make way for a $22 million housing project. While some 200 curious Brooklynites stood silent during the farewell ceremonies, the 69th Regiment Band struck up The Star-spangled Banner, a mink-coated Lucy Monroe sang and eager hands ran up the American flag in center field for the last time. Home plate went to Lee Allen, historian of the Baseball Hall of Fame, for delivery to Cooperstown. "A glorious reminder," said Allen.

The major leagues signed a $20 million TV-radio contract with NBC and Gillette for World Series and All-Star games from 1962 through 1966 at an increase of $500,000 a year over the old contract. The future of the players' pension fund was assured under the new agreement. Sixty percent of the proceeds will go to players' fund; 40% will be divided among the 16 club owners. Commissioner Ford Frick announced that in the event the Continental League becomes eligible to take part in World Series play the contract would be renegotiated or canceled. However, Frick noted, "I have no such current expectations."

HORSE RACING—A dozen determined Thoroughbreds, including such notables as Bagdad, First Landing, Amerigo and Silver Spoon, raced out of the starting gate and scooted for the money in the $145,000 Santa Anita Handicap. Favorites and front runners were upset by a frisky California colt named Linmold, who pounded out of the far turn to pass pace-setting Fleet Nasrullah. Ralph Neves whipped Fleet Nasrullah back to the front but Linmold, under the urging of Don Pierce, won by a head. Amerigo finished third, with Bagdad and Silver Spoon behind him.

In a race with Kentucky Derby overtones Edgehill Farm's Bally Ache (see page 36) J proved he can win at a mile and an eighth. Beaten a week before by Canada's Victoria Park at 1 1/16 miles, Bally Ache beat Victoria Park by three lengths in 1:48, second fastest time in 31 Flamingos.

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JERNBBRG

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VUARNET

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WAGNER AND PAUL

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GUSAKOVA

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BIEBL

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HAASE

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LESTANDER

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SKOBLIKOVA

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STAUB

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HUHTALA, ALATALO, MANTYRANTA, HAKULINEN

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JOHANSSON, RUTHSTROM, STRANDBERG

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OLYMPIC CHIEF BRUNDAGE

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RECKNAGEL

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McCARTAN

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JOHANNESEN

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HAMALAINEN

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JENKINS

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HEGGTVEIT

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AAS, GRISHIN

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HINTERSEER

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KOSICHKIN

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GUSEVA

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THOMA

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RUEGG

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SKOBLIKOVA

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HEISS

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BRUSVEEN

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GRISHIN