Skip to main content
Original Issue

The Vault

Every SI Story ... Every SI Photo ... Ever SI.COM/VAULT

EXCERPT | Nov. 26, 1973

Artis at Work

A dominant ABA center was only getting better

The Kentucky Colonels had recently switched to a fast-break offense when Peter Carry reported on the team and its 24-year-old big man.

What would give me the biggest thrill would be if I could grab a rebound, turn in midair and throw the ball out to an open man at half-court before I hit the floor," says Colonels center Artis Gilmore. He is a quiet, perhaps too gentle man whose slender frame—he is 7'2" and weighs 240 pounds—is deceiving. Although his waist is only 32", each of his thighs is 27" around, and Gilmore's hamstrings are so developed that he appears to be running and jumping on the world's largest frogs' legs, a real asset in his newest hobby, scuba diving. The MVP of the ABA in 1972, Gilmore is now even better and one of the league's most improved performers. His hesitancy to block shots is gone, and he so thoroughly dominates the league in rebounding that his average of 18.8 a game leads the ABA by five.

The man now charged with coaching Gilmore and the suddenly fast-breaking Colonels is Babe McCarthy, Old Magnolia Breath himself, whose pro teams previously have not shown any inclination to move any faster than their coach talks. "Gawdang, coachin' a fast-break team is the easiest jawb 'cause ya don't hafta figure awt how to break down defenses," says McCarthy. "I jus' never had the main ingredient ya need ta break—the big reboundin' center. When we git the runnin' game down goood we kin leave most of the reboundin' to Awrtis and e'ryone else kin run like heck down the cawt."

Taken No. 1 by the Bulls in the 1976 ABA dispersal draft, Gilmore played 11 NBA seasons, averaging 10.1 rebounds and making six All-Star teams.

Check out SI.COM/BONUS | Breaking News | Real-time Scores | Daily Analysis

NFL

MLB

NBA

NHL

College Football

Taming the Wildcat

SI.com's Andrew Perloff examines the much-hyped Wildcat offense and why, after last season's splash, it has had such limited success in the NFL this year:

This was supposed to be the season the Wildcat evolved to the next level and swept through the NFL. A year after the Dolphins used it to surprising success, coaches from coast to coast were expected to implement it as a game-changer, to keep defenses off balance and grab big chunks of yardage. It hasn't happened. If anything, the Wildcat revolution is stuck in neutral. Philadelphia created buzz in the off-season by signing Michael Vick(left), ostensibly to run the Wildcat. Through Week 11 he has 13 carries for 61 yards and had completed just 3 of 8 passes for six yards. The Eagles are one of several NFL teams who've tried the alignment (loosely defined as a direct snap to a player other than the quarterback), but none have had as much success as the Dolphins. And the fact that Miami has now lost Ronnie Brown(above) for the season with a foot injury is another setback; Brown was Miami's best Wildcat weapon.

Online Cover Gallery

This Week in SI

1954

This 54-year-old

Peugeot starred for Great Britain at the Anglo-American Vintage Car Rally, an 850-mile race from Edinburgh to Chichester. The British team beat the U.S.

1984

BC quarterback

Doug Flutie didn't know it but he'd already been voted the Heisman winner when he launched a 64-yard Hail Mary pass to beat Miami on the game's final play.

1994

The Steelers'

21--3 squashing of the Raiders—aided by the play of tackle Brentson Buckner (96)—had them 9--3 and thinking Super Bowl. That dream would die in the AFC title game.

GALLERIES

Muhammad Ali Top Heavyweights

Harrison Barnes Prep Recruits

Thierry Henry World Cup 2010

PHOTO

Photograph by JOHN D. HANLON

HAPPY GILMORE Artis's accurate passing helped make the Colonels' fast break go, and he had a pretty sweet scoring touch too: His career shooting percentage of .599 remains the NBA record.

PHOTO

BOB ISEAR (AUTO RACING)

PHOTO

HEINZ KLUETMEIER (FLUTIE)

PHOTO

RICHARD MACKSON (STEELERS)

PHOTO

BILL FRAKES (GAME)

TWO PHOTOS

DAVID BERGMAN (BROWN, VICK)

PHOTO

STU FORSTER/GETTY IMAGES (HENRY)

PHOTO

CHARLIE NEIBERGALL/AP PHOTO (HARRISON)

PHOTO

TONY TRIOLO (ALI)