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RUSSELL WILSON

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It's one thing to spark a trend, but it's another to INSPIRE A MOVEMENT. These athletes are fostering change with their style

RUSSELL WILSON looks up from his mixed fruit bowl and past the replica Lombardi Trophy displayed in his corner office high above downtown Seattle. Out the window, a helicopter whirs past CenturyLink Field, where Wilson compiled half of his MVP-caliber 2017 season, his sixth as the Seahawks' QB. He breaks the silence with a casual "I've been flying helicopters." Because, of course. This is Russell Wilson. During the offseason Wilson has taken batting practice with the Yankees, hired a movement specialist, attended a Formula 1 race in Canada and learned to fly. Helicopters, anyway. "I'm a little more adventurous than people give me credit for," he says. "I've always been an entrepreneur. I think of [my] brand and being consistent and authentic to the things I love."

Wilson started his Good Man Brand clothing line two years ago, hoping to fill the untapped space between athletic and formal wear. "Most men don't have a midrange game," he says. He started by selling GMB at 15 Nordstrom stores in the greater Seattle area; now the line is in every Nordstrom and more than 150 other clothing stores. Wilson donates $3 from every purchase—matching his jersey number—to his charitable foundation, Why Not You?

Fashion hooked Wilson early on. He would take thousands of screenshots of clothes he wanted to buy or create once his NFL career started. He studied designers such as Tom Ford, Calvin Klein, Riccardo Tisci and Hugo Boss, and he favored a sleek, European fit. His fashion idol? James Bond.

Outsiders might look at the Seahawks players who left the team this spring and see a perennial contender in peril. Not Wilson. He's not styled that way. James Bond doesn't rebuild. "I don't really care what people are thinking," Wilson says. "I don't really pay attention to it." He's too busy selling hoodies and learning, literally, to fly.

ALY RAISMAN

With her powerful physique, the gold medal gymnast carries herself with confidence while standing up against sexual abuse and harassment.

IBTIHAJ MUHAMMAD

The first American Muslim woman to win an Olympic medal, the fencer created Louella, a moderately priced, modest-clothing line for women.

ADAM RIPPON

As an openly gay Olympic athlete, Rippon is a risk-taker with fashion and an authoritative advocate for LGBTQ+ causes.

"THIS QUARTERBACK'S OFF-DUTY VIBE SHOWCASES AN ELEVATED ATHLEISURE LOOK THAT IS BOTH TAILORED AND COMFORTABLE."

—COURTNEY MAYS