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AMONG THOSE WE LOST IN 2018: A MIRACLE MILER, THE SILVER FOX, A BLACKHAWKS BULWARK AND THE RECEIVER WHO MADE THE CATCH

PENNY MARSHALL, 75

The Bronx-born actress and director (below) loved baseball: She owned a seat from the original Yankee Stadium, and her 1992 masterpiece, A League of Their Own, shone a light on the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

RED SCHOENDIENST, 95

His 67 seasons with the Cardinals' organization included 10 All-Star selections as a second baseman and 1,041 wins as a manager.

ROGER BANNISTER, 88

Bannister (right), SI's first Sportsperson of the Year, broke the four-minute barrier in the mile in 1954. He retired from running later that year and spent 40 years as a neurologist.

LUIS VALBUENA, 33

The infielder slugged 114 home runs in 11 major league seasons. He died in a car accident in his native Venezuela along with infielder José Castillo.

BILLY CANNON, 80

A halfback whose style befit his surname, he led LSU to the 1958 national championship and won the Heisman Trophy in '59. Cannon spurned the NFL for the Houston Oilers and was MVP of the first two AFL title games.

FRANK RAMSEY, 86

The NBA's first great sixth man, the 6'3" Hall of Famer was part of seven title-winning teams in his nine seasons with the Celtics.

OSCAR GAMBLE, 68

Know for his voluminous Afro (when the Yankees forced him to cut it in 1975, the trip to the barber lasted an hour), the outfielder (below), who rarely played against lefties, belted 200 homers.

JOHNNY BOWER, 93

Known as "The China Wall," the goalie didn't make his debut with the Maple Leafs until age 34, but he lifted four Stanley Cups and claimed two Vezina trophies.

PETER THOMSON, 88

The only golfer to win the same major three years in a row, the Aussie captured five British Opens in the 1950s and '60s.

KEITH JACKSON, 89

The versatile announcer was at his affable, homespun best doing college football, where he introduced his audience to terms like big uglies and possum-hunting moon.

HAL GREER, 81

A 10-time All-Star guard (below) who spent his 15-year career with the same franchise, Greer averaged 29.2 points in the 1967 East finals as the 76ers ended Boston's 10-year Finals run.

DWIGHT CLARK, 61

Clark (below) was a 10th-round pick in 1979 after an 11-catch senior season at Clemson. Two years later he had 82 receptions for the 49ers, and following that season he made one of the most famous grabs ever—aka the Catch—to beat the Cowboys in the NFC title game.

RUSTY STAUB, 73

After a major league career that included 2,716 hits and six All-Star Games, Staub (below) launched foundations that raised hundreds of millions of dollars to benefit the hungry as well as the families of fallen first responders.

TOMMY MCDONALD, 84

The smallest player in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the 5'7" receiver scored 13 touchdowns in 1960 as the Eagles won the NFL championship.

WILLIE NAULLS, 84

The first black captain of a major sports franchise, Naulls made four All-Star teams as a forward for the Knicks. He also won three titles with the Celtics.

DOUG HARVEY, 87

A major league umpire for 31 seasons, Harvey was so revered that players and managers called him God.

BRUNO SAMMARTINO, 82

A self-described "real 80-pound weakling" when he emigrated from Italy at 15, Sammartino hit the weights and became the most famous wrestler in the world, holding the WWWF (the precursor of WWE) belt for 11 years.

ANNE DONOVAN, 56

A dominant 6'8" center at Old Dominion, Donovan (above) won Olympic gold medals in 1984 and '88. She coached the Storm to the 2004 WNBA title and the U.S. to gold in '08.

TITO FRANCONA, 84

A fine slugger who hit .363 for the Indians in 1959, Francona changed teams eight times in a 15-year career, making for a peripatetic upbringing for his son, Terry, the Tribe's current manager.

IRENA SZEWINSKA, 72

The only sprinter to simultaneously hold the 100-, 200- and 400-meter world records, Szewinska won seven Olympic medals for Poland.

HUBERT GREEN, 71

The gregarious Alabaman who once said, "I can have fun watchin' paint dry," also got his kicks on the golf course, winning 19 tourneys, including the 1977 U.S. Open and the '85 PGA.

CHUCK KNOX, 86

Known as Ground Chuck, Knox succeeded everywhere he went with his brand of smashmouth football. He won NFL Coach of the Year honors for three teams and finished with 186 wins, 11th most of all time.

ISIAH ROBERTSON, 69

A mainstay on the Rams teams that won six straight NFC West titles in the 1970s, the linebacker made six Pro Bowls.

STAN MIKITA, 78

A mix of strength (he did at least 50 push-ups a day and had wrists so powerful that he once won 34 of 35 face-offs in a game) and finesse (his touch enabled him to set the NHL single-season assist record in 1964--65), Mikita (above) was a Blackhawks mainstay for 22 years.

DAVID PEARSON, 83

NASCAR's cool Silver Fox, who insisted his car have a working cigarette lighter, won more races (105) than anyone except Richard Petty (200), who had twice as many starts.

BILL FRALIC, 56

In the midst of a career in which he was named to the NFL's 1980s all-decade team as an offensive guard for the Falcons, Fralic testified before a Senate committee on steroid use in the NFL—including his own—in an attempt to rid the league of performance-enhancing drugs.

BRUCE KISON, 68

The hard-throwing righty had an eventful 1971 postseason: He pitched 11 scoreless innings for the Pirates, then helicoptered to his wedding after their Game 7 win in the World Series.

DAN GURNEY, 86

The dashing Californian (above) had the talent to match his abundant swagger: He won races in Indy, F1, NASCAR and sports cars, a feat only two drivers have since matched.

WALTER BAHR, 91

The last surviving member of the 1950 U.S. World Cup soccer team that shocked England, Bahr was also father to a pair of NFL kickers, Matt and Chris.

JO JO WHITE, 71

The high-scoring point guard (below) led the Celtics to titles in 1974 and '76. "White does everything better than any man of his size I have ever seen," his coach at Kansas, Phog Allen, told SI in '67. "Watch him and you think he's floating in oil."

CAROL MANN, 71

At a time when women's golf struggled for attention—Mann was once bumped from Johnny Carson in favor of a guy who played a homemade harmonica—the 6'3" Hall of Famer won 38 events.

ED CHARLES, 84

When fans sent Charles autograph requests, he often responded by sending them his poetry. The New York Times called the third baseman "the heart and soul of the Miracle Mets of 1969."

JOHN GAGLIARDI, 91

No college football coach has more victories than Gagliardi's 489. In 60 seasons at Saint John's in Collegeville, Minn., he won two NAIA and two NCAA Division III titles.

JIM TAYLOR, 83

The punishing fullback (below) helped the Packers to four NFL titles and in 1962 became the only back not named Jim Brown to win a rushing title during Brown's nine-year career.

AUGIE GARRIDO, 71

Such an Austin institution that Richard Linklater made a feature-length documentary about him, the gruff Garrido won an NCAA-record 1,975 games. Eight of his 15 College World Series appearances came as Texas's coach.

TEX WINTER, 96

After leading Kansas State to two Final Fours with his triangle offense, Winter became an NBA assistant, winning nine titles with the Bulls and the Lakers.

WILLIE McCOVEY, 80

The first Giants star to debut in San Francisco, Stretch built a special relationship with Bay Area fans, whom he routinely awed while smacking 521 homers during a 22-year career.

PAUL ZIMMERMAN, 86

An offensive lineman at Columbia and Stanford, Dr. Z—who wrote about the NFL for SI for nearly three decades—had an appreciation for the brute, physical nature of the game, which came through in his writing. Witness his description of the 1979 Steelers: "[Their] defensive line has a tackle called Mean Joe and an end called Mad Dog. Their middle linebacker has almost no teeth. Their right linebacker is named Dirt. And their quarterback ... man, if Terry Bradshaw ain't limping and bleeding, the argument hasn't even started." While Z was known for his tactical, X's-and-O's analysis based on the elaborate charts he kept (he even tracked national anthem times), his writing was sneakily clever. "Random House's unabridged dictionary defines a blitz this way: 'War waged by surprise, swiftly and violently, as by the use of aircraft, tanks, etc.' Etcetera stands for Lawrence Taylor." And his profiles—especially of his trench brethren such as Raiders defensive end Howie Long—were rendered with humanity and empathy. "It's all there ahead of him," Zim wrote of Long in 1985, "a life of infinite promise, and yet almost every story he tells about himself, every anecdote, has an undercurrent of despair. It's not me, he seems to be telling you, this isn't really me that you see here in front of you."